Tag

bikram yoga

Studio News

Core Strength, Iron Hour and Standing Head to Knee

Iron Hour helps build core strength, which helps improve your postures in the Sterling 60 and Gold 90 hot yoga classes! In many of the standing poses in our yoga series, we talk about the locked knee. The locked knee, in good alignment with the ankle and the hip, is absolutely important, and it takes a great deal of strength to maintain it for more than a few moments. In Standing Head to Knee, locking both knees is especially challenging. In this wonderful photo example, Jason Winn is executing the full expression of the pose where his arms are extended,…
Jodi Chmielewski
March 1, 2015
Studio News

Yoga Anatomy: Agonist & Antagonist Muscle Groups

When you bring the hand toward the shoulder, the biceps is the agonist muscle and the triceps is the antagonist muscle. In the last newsletter, we discussed the elements of alignment. I hope that you have had the opportunity to focus on your alignment both in and out of the hot room. Alignment is such an important part of you practice and of your life! This time, we'll talk about agonist and antagonist muscle groups. For almost every major movement in the body, there is an agonist and antagonist muscle involved. The agonist muscle is the primary mover involved. Usually…
Jodi Chmielewski
November 1, 2014
Studio News

How to Lock the Knee in Proper Alignment

Engage your abs in the balancing series poses. Your core strength helps with both balance and alignment. When people first start to practice and hear teachers tell yogis to lock their knee, a variety of thoughts pop into their head: "No way! My coach told me to always keep the knees bent!" "No way! My drill sergeant (or choral teacher or minister) told me I'd pass out if I locked my knees!" "No way! That will hurt!" "Okay" Every one of these answers is a legitimate response. The key to locking your knee is knowing HOW to lock your knees…
Jodi Chmielewski
September 1, 2014
Studio News

Half Tortoise: Did You Know?

Touching your forehead to the floor is an important step in Half Tortoise pose. There's a reason we tell you to touch your forehead to your knee, or to the floor! The pineal gland, also known as "the third eye," is a small endocrine gland in the brain. It produces melatonin, which affects both sleep patterns and circadian rhythms. As we age, the pineal starts to develop calcium deposits, which isn't necessarily a good thing! Touching your forehead to your knee or the floor can help to stimulate the pineal gland. Now I'm not sure that doing Half Tortoise is…
Jodi Chmielewski
August 1, 2014